My Life And Likes In A Nutshell

504 notes

biocanvas:

Developing zebrafish embryo

Our understanding of how animals grow from a single cell to billions of cells has benefited tremendously from the easy-to-visualize nature of zebrafish embryos. This video begins roughly two hours after a zebrafish egg has been fertilized and covers approximately 24 hours of the embryo’s life. In less than a day, the embryo will progress through dramatic changes in shape as cells move and specialize in a process called gastrulation. By 9 hours after fertilization, the rudimentary brain will start to thicken, and by 12 hours, premature eyes form. Muscular twitches begin and exaggerate from 20 hours onward before the heart even starts beating properly. Within three days from the start of its one-cell journey, the fish will reach the length of a sesame seed before swimming in search of food.

Video by Dr. Andrei Kobitski, Dr. Jens Otte and Dr. Johannes Stegmaier, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany.

(Source: olympusbioscapes.com, via scishow)

52,154 notes

hartorotica:

I’m just saying -

Theoretically, since there seems to be no life form on Mars right now, and we have sent robots to transmit information to us, that implies that 100% of Mars’ current population consists out of robots.

We have a planet in our universe that’s solely inhabited by robots. Mars is a robot planet.

(via mydrunkkitchen)

1,720 notes

thebeakerblog:

What the heck is this? Last week, we asked you about this curiosity found in the Connecticut River. Today, the jury is back. Eric Schultz, an associate professor of ecology and biology at the University of Connecticut, says it’s a bryozoan.
Likely called pectinatella magnifica, this colonial organism (made up of individual animals called zooids), can either attach itself to other river objects or float freely. Very cool animal and a great photo. Thanks for the submission!

thebeakerblog:

What the heck is this? Last week, we asked you about this curiosity found in the Connecticut River. Today, the jury is back. Eric Schultz, an associate professor of ecology and biology at the University of Connecticut, says it’s a bryozoan.

Likely called pectinatella magnifica, this colonial organism (made up of individual animals called zooids), can either attach itself to other river objects or float freely. Very cool animal and a great photo. Thanks for the submission!

(via scishow)